The Bye-Bye Bouquet by Chi Yu Rodriguez

The Bye-Bye Bouquet by Chi Yu Rodriguez
Publication Date: February 2016
Source: Purchased
Rating: ★★★★
Amazon

Synopsis

Every month for the past year, like clockwork, Meile Simon has gotten orders at her shop for the same type of bouquet, from the same guy, delivered to twelve different girls. By the third month, she starts to take note.

Warren Leigh likes women. He does. He knows there are too many beautiful women out there just waiting to be plucked by the right guy. But he firmly believes that personal relationships with them must have an expiration date.

When the girl who likes to watch flowers bloom encounters the guy who’s only in it while the fragrance lasts, curiosity gets the best of both of them.

In the midst of intermittent weather, will their connection blossom or wilt?

This is actually one of the first books I put in my #romanceclass to-buy list because I fell in love with the cover, and the premise is very intriguing.

The story is pretty short, and I would’ve liked some more things to be explored. I needed some more rationalization on Warren’s issues, and I needed a little more character growth, but I did enjoy most the parts that were already here.

I super love Meile’s disposition in life and her passion for flowers. I also kind of identify with her old lady habits, she’s adorable. I also loved how intuitive and supportive her dad is. Also, I would definitely want to read more on Geoffrey and Rachel, they’re very cute.

Fun fact: I see Warren as M. A gif of his side smirk replays in my mind when he said “tatoos freak you out?” during the live reading. Hahaha.

To summarize, this is a great book that I really enjoyed reading, and #romanceclass books are such good books that if you have not read at least one of them yet, I suggest you start. Please start.

Keeping the Distance by Clarisse David

Keeping The Distance by Clarisse David
Publication Date: February 6th 2017
Source:  ARC from Author
Rating: ★★★★
Amazon

Synopsis

No bets. No fake relationships. Just a very real one that has to be kept under wraps.

Seventeen-year-old Melissa wants to dye her hair cotton candy pink and focus on her ukulele instead of Physics. But she can’t. As the daughter of a Catholic school principal, living up to her model student image 24/7 is a must. Something’s about to give under all the pressure. She only hopes it isn’t her.

Getting involved with a troublemaking basketball player is the last possible thing she needs…

Lance is used to getting what he wants. With a pretty face he uses to full advantage and his role as co-captain of the basketball team, the easy way is the only way he’s ever known. Until the day he notices the prim Melissa he’s known forever is actually hot and decides to ask her out. He has no idea he’s about to learn the lesson of a lifetime.

Not getting what he wants might exactly be what he needs…

I received an ARC of this book from the Author. No compensation in any form was received for the review of this book.

Hate to love trope isn’t exactly my favorite but I did enjoy this book so much. Clarisse David writes these types of stories so damn good. It really took me a long time before I was able to form coherent thoughts about the book, I have to admit that I’m still struggling, but screw it. This review might be short but I need to share these thoughts with you, and hopefully force you to pick this book up!!!

I thoroughly enjoyed the banter between Lance and Melissa. It actually reminded me of two of my friends back in high school, and guess what? They ended up as a couple, they still are until today.  I also love the development of both characters, and their dynamics.

The story was a little predictable but I love the anticipation I felt while silently longing for that happy ending. The pacing was also a little slow at times, but overall this was a cute, swoonworthy read! I highly recommend this book!

Blog Tour || The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Publication Date: February 28th 2017 by Balzer + Bray
Source: ARC from Publisher via Edelweiss
Rating: ★★★★★
Amazon / Book Depository

Synopsis

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend, Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, Khalil’s death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Starr’s best friend at school suggests he may have had it coming. When it becomes clear the police have little interest in investigating the incident, protesters take to the streets and Starr’s neighborhood becomes a war zone. What everyone wants to know is: What really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could destroy her community. It could also endanger her life.

I received an ARC of this book from the Publisher. No compensation in any form was received for the review of this book.

This book is revolutionary. I’m honestly left without words. I don’t even need to pitch this book because I’m pretty sure it’s either you’ve already read it or it’s on top of your TBR pile. If you haven’t heard of this book, well, where were you in the past several months?

I feel like this review is going to be really short because I’m still speechless about this book. This is just going to be me, pushing the book to you.This book is inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, and damn right it’s a great tale.

This book is inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, and damn right it’s a great tale. I really enjoyed the story and the characters and their dynamics. Starr was relatable and a badass heroine. I love her relationship with her family. Her brothers are funny, and her parents are basically her OTP! She’s also close to her Uncle Carlos. The book practically contained 40% family relationships.

“It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.”

It also explored interracial relationships and I really appreciated it. The Hate U Give opened my eyes and mind further when it comes to racial issues and the whole Black Lives Matter movement. I felt more educated about it and this is why this book is really important. Besides racism, it also tackled police violence and the criminal justice system.

This book has been making noise and has never left the spotlight since last year and it definitely deserved all the early praises and hype. Angie Thomas’s writing is thoughtful and genuine. She perfectly incorporated relevant social issues in a contemporary novel, which is something I’m definitely looking forward to reading more in the future. Honestly, if you haven’t read this book yet, please do!

Blog Tour || History Is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera

history is all you left meHistory Is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera
Publication Date: January 17th 2017 by Soho Teen
Source: ARC for Blog Tour
Rating: ★★★★★
Amazon / Book Depository

Synopsis

When Griffin’s first love and ex-boyfriend, Theo, dies in a drowning accident, his universe implodes. Even though Theo had moved to California for college and started seeing Jackson, Griffin never doubted Theo would come back to him when the time was right. But now, the future he’s been imagining for himself has gone far off course.

To make things worse, the only person who truly understands his heartache is Jackson. But no matter how much they open up to each other, Griffin’s downward spiral continues. He’s losing himself in his obsessive compulsions and destructive choices, and the secrets he’s been keeping are tearing him apart.

If Griffin is ever to rebuild his future, he must first confront his history, every last heartbreaking piece in the puzzle of his life.

I received a review copy of this book as part of a Blog Tour. No compensation in any form was received for the review of this book.

This is my first Adam Silvera book, albeit having a lot of friends that have already read and enjoyed his first book, More Happy Than Not. Good thing though, that I have my copy of MHTN at home so I could read it whenever I want to AKA soon.

Every single praise about this book is true. It’s brutally honest and basically one big emotional sucker punch to the gut. Upon reading the first chapters of the book, I already made the conclusion that I’ll love this book to pieces.

I really enjoyed reading through Griffin’s voice. The story is very character-driven and it was easy to follow suit. What’s interesting about Griffin is he’s actually an unreliable narrator and I didn’t see that coming. It was also eye-opening to read about his OCD impulses, and this was very new to me because the usual stereotype about people having OCD was them being a neat freak. This book is also an #ownvoices novel and it made me realize how hard it is for people to deal with OCD.

“I’ll never understand how time can make a moment feel as close as yesterday and as far as years.”

Each character in the story leaves an impact to the reader. I didn’t have any expectations with Jackson, I knew he would surprise me but Wade surprised me more. I guess he’s one of the most loyal characters I’ve ever encountered in a book.

Another thing I loved about the book is the non-linear narrative. It’s told in two POVs and timelines, both Griffin’s but the present timeline refers to the reader as Theo.

I loved the conflicting and raw emotions from the characters and how they filled the book. It’s definitely one of the most honest and raw novels I’ve read so far. I fell in love with Adam Silvera’s writing the moment I finished the first chapter. His writing style is so genuine, poignant, and full of passion.

“People are complicated puzzles, always trying to piece together a complete picture, but sometimes we get it wrong and sometimes we’re left unfinished. Sometimes that’s for the best. Some pieces can’t be forced into a puzzle, or at least they shouldn’t be, because they won’t make sense.”

Overall, this novel is an exceptional tale of grief, loss, friendship, and most of all love. It’s beautifully crafted and well balanced in terms of light and heavy scenes. I’m definitely looking forward to reading more of Adam Silvera’s works, but for now, let me settle with More Happy Than Not.